NOTICE

NOTICE

Wednesday, January 21, 2015

Desire and Tease

A joyous party of nymphs were playing in the woods
Loudly amongst their own, they were gleeful and without sorrows
Nymphs are playful, and beautiful, it is in their nature
A satyr happened upon the scene
After watching he lustfully called to them
As is in a Satyr's being
The nymphs ran towards him
He hoped to satisfy his hunger, his growing ardor
They were confusing him though
Making him wonder at their motives.
Were they now willing?
If so, why did they giggle
Move when he tried to touch them
Why were they calling to their sisters to come
When they didn't need more
None had done anything yet
The satyr felt great confusion
As well as lust
Growing anger
Frustration
Wonder
Pathetic desire
Eventually the moment ended
With screaming by the satyr
And then the nymphs were gone
He was left with a rise in his loins
But with no satisfaction
The satyr walked a lonely walk
Deeper into the woods
Alone
With his passionate lust
Burning


Nymphs and Satyr (French: Nymphes et un satyre) is a painting, oil on canvas, created by artist William-Adolphe Bouguereau in 1873.

William-Adolphe Bouguereau

French, 1825–1905

Nymphs and Satyr

1873
Oil on canvas
102 1/2 x 72 in. (260.4 x 182.9 cm) Frame: 122 1/8 x 90 3/4 x 7 in. (310.2 x 230.5 x 17.8 cm)

Acquired by Sterling and Francine Clark, 1942
1955.658

ON VIEW

- See more at: http://www.clarkart.edu/Collection/6158#sthash.pD1EENcK.dpuf
Three nymphs playfully drag a Satyr into a woodland pond, while a fourth calls to her companions in the distance. Satyrs—half-man, half-goat—were reputedly unable to swim. Bouguereau exhibited this painting, accompanied by a verse from the Latin poem that inspired it, at the 1873 Paris Salon. Its vaguely classical subject provided an ideal opportunity to demonstrate his skill painting the female nude from multiple viewpoints. An American collector immediately bought the work, which eventually ended up on display in the bar of New York City’s Hoffman House, where Sterling Clark first encountered it. - See more at: http://www.clarkart.edu/Collection/6158#sthash.KuVDPhWh.dpuf
Three nymphs playfully drag a Satyr into a woodland pond, while a fourth calls to her companions in the distance. Satyrs—half-man, half-goat—were reputedly unable to swim. Bouguereau exhibited this painting, accompanied by a verse from the Latin poem that inspired it, at the 1873 Paris Salon. Its vaguely classical subject provided an ideal opportunity to demonstrate his skill painting the female nude from multiple viewpoints. An American collector immediately bought the work, which eventually ended up on display in the bar of New York City’s Hoffman House, where Sterling Clark first encountered it. - See more at: http://www.clarkart.edu/Collection/6158#sthash.KuVDPhWh.dpuf

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